The George Mateljan Healthy Way of Eating

Introduction

Food is the key to life. It is the source of good health and energy. Eating healthy foods can benefit all of us.

One thing that can prevent us from eating the right foods is a mistaken idea that a “healthy diet” takes the enjoyment out of eating and deprives us of good taste. That’s why George Mateljan has created the George Mateljan Healthy Way of Eating (The Healthy Way of Eating). The Healthy Way of Eating is a meal planning approach that emphasizes healthy, wellness-promoting foods (The World’s Healthiest Foods) whose wonderful tastes will allow you to continually experience the pure joy of eating. Its principles and tools provide you with everything you need to make eating healthy foods enjoyable, convenient, easy and suited to your individual needs.

With The Healthy Way of Eating , you’ll discover which of the thousands of foods are the World’s Healthiest Foods. Then you’ll find out how to prepare them, so they maintain their full nutritional value and their delicious flavors. You’ll also be able to have your individual lifestyle and health requirements addressed with personalized food analysis and menu plans.

History

George Mateljan’s study of food began over 30 years ago. He wanted to know how to feel his best while maintaining the pure joy of eating. His search for answers has taken him to over 80 countries around the world. He studied foods wherever healthy people live long lives. He tasted Russian borscht, Bulgarian yogurt, Hunza apricots and Mediterranean fish, vegetables, fruits and pasta. By traveling around the world, George discovered which foods are the world’s healthiest, and he learned how to prepare them so that they are full of flavor.

As he made his discoveries, George would share the information with others by writing and publishing books. Over the years, he has published five books that have been read and used by millions of people.

After over 30 years of studying and then listening to feedback from people who have read and used the information in his books, George discovered that there are basic things health-conscious people want and need in order to make eating healthy foods their regular way of eating. George subsequently dedicated himself to developing The World’s Healthiest Foods website which features information and tools that can help people easily follow the principles of The Healthy Way of Eating .

Popularity

As more and more people have experienced how nutrient-rich foods, like the World’s Healthiest Foods, can help them look and feel their best, the popularity of these foods has skyrocketed. Additionally, due to higher consumer demand, increased availability and the entry of some large-scale foods manufacturers into the natural and organic foods marketplace, prices of these foods have been steadily dropping, creating another factor that has made these foods more accessible and, subsequently, even more popular.

Principles

The basic principles of The Healthy Way of Eating are:

  1. You have to know how to choose the most nutritious foods.
  2. You have to know how to prepare them the healthy way using the right recipes to enjoy the full flavors.
  3. You have to select foods and recipes to meet your individual needs.

How to Choose the Most Nutritious Foods

There are thousands of foods in the world, and all of them have some nutrients. The World’s Healthiest Foods, however, are those that are the most nutrient-dense, and therefore are the ones that should be emphasized in a person’s diet.

Nutrient-density is a measure of the amount of nutrients a food contains in comparison with the number of calories it has. The higher the level of nutrients compared to the number of calories, the more nutrient-dense a food is. By eating the World’s Healthiest Foods, you’ll get all the essential nutrients that you need for excellent health, including vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, essential fatty acids, fiber and more. Visit Foods and Spices for a complete list of the World’s Healthiest Foods and detailed information about each food.

To determine which foods are the healthiest and most nutrient-dense, two standards were used. First, George discovered the World’s Healthiest Foods through his travels and studies. Then these foods had to meet stringent scientific criteria for nutritional excellence. Studies demonstrating the health benefits of nutrient-dense foods have been conducted for many years, and recently, more advanced methods of scientific analysis have revealed the biochemical mechanisms behind these beneficial actions, so the selection of the World’s Healthiest Foods is based on scientific data not guesswork or personal opinion. Our Food and Recipe Rating System provides an explanation of the methods used to rate foods and recipes.

How to Prepare Foods the Healthy Way Using the Right Recipes to Enjoy their Full Flavors

To enjoy both the taste and nutritional benefits of the World’s Healthiest Foods, you have to prepare them properly. Healthy cooking methods enable you to maximize the flavor and texture of food, as well as its nutritional value. Cooking foods for too long or at too high a heat can destroy their wonderful flavors, as well as their beneficial vitamins and antioxidants. At the same time, too much heat can result in the production of harmful compounds such as free radicals and trans-fats. To make it easy for you to learn the right cooking methods, The World’s Healthiest Foods website offers an In Home Healthy Cooking School where quick and easy techniques such as Healthy Sauté, Healthy Stir Fry, and Healthy Baking are demonstrated. With these cooking techniques, you’ll be able to prepare healthy foods that taste delicious, regardless of how much cooking experience you have.

The World’s Healthiest Foods are not only nutrient-dense, they’re also some of the world’s best tasting foods. To maintain their wonderful tastes, George Mateljan has created recipes for the World’s Healthiest Foods that do not overpower their unique flavors. Instead, each recipe is a flavor adventure that lets you discover new ways to experience the great natural tastes of these foods. In creating healthy recipes, George recognized that they not only had to bring out all the nutrition and good taste in the ingredients, they also had to be fast, easy to prepare and fun to make. That’s why you’ll find that most recipes in The Healthy Way of Eating take 30 minutes or less to make. George understands that eating the healthy way has to be convenient and fit the time schedules of today’s busy lifestyles. Good Tasting Healthy Recipes provides dozens of healthy recipes each with detailed directions for preparation and tips to make sure your meals are a success.

Select Foods and Recipes to Meet your Individual Needs

The George Mateljan Healthy Way of Eating doesn’t try to fit everyone into the same “food formula.” It respects individuality. It recognizes that we all have our own personal needs and concerns, as well as our unique tastes, schedules, and lifestyles. To this end, this website has unique tools that will help you meet your own personal dietary needs.

Using the World’s Healthiest Foods website can also help you understand how your nutritional needs change and how to fulfill them. For example, both a middle-aged mother who is experiencing menopausal symptoms and her teenaged daughter who is just beginning her first menstrual cycle must adjust to the changes their bodies are undergoing. Yet the changes are different, and so are the nutritional adjustments needed. That’s why for both males and females of different ages, ethnic backgrounds, and geographic areas, this website offers personalized analyses of nutritional needs and how to fulfill them. Best Foods for Me provides you with a personal analysis and recommends nutrients, foods and recipes tailored to your individual needs.

Research

Studies have found that populations whose diets feature significant amounts of certain foods have a significantly lower risk of developing many chronic degenerative diseases, including, but not limited to, cardiovascular disease, Type II diabetes mellitus, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and depression. In fact, five of the top ten causes of death in the United States are associated with the Standard American Diet. An ever-growing body of research has brought both scientists and nutritionists to propose that we can significantly decrease morbidity and mortality, and dramatically improve our chances of living a longer, healthier more vibrant life, simply by eating healthier foods.

So, what distinguishes a health-promoting diet from one that does not support health and vitality? Research shows that diets featuring foods such as whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, legumes and fish, in short, the World's Healthiest Foods, are not only associated with lower risks of diseases, but also support healthy aging, giving us the power to promote our own health and longevity.

Scientific research has shown how the nutrients in which the World’s Healthiest Foods are dense are the key elements that allow our bodies to perform the myriad activities necessary to keep our selves both physically and mentally at our peak. These foods can help us to look and feel our best as well as provide long-term health benefits, including reducing the risk of health problems. Interestingly, it seems that it may not just be the individual nutrients themselves, but how they synergistically interact in whole foods, like the World’s Healthiest Foods, that gives these foods their healing potential.

Foods Emphasized

The Healthy Way of Eating emphasizes nutrient-rich foods, such as The World’s Healthiest Foods, all of which are commonly found “everyday” foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds, lean meats, fish, olive oil, herbs and spices. In addition to being a storehouse of nutrients, these foods are also whole foods (in contrast to adulterated or refined) foods, real foods complete with all their rich natural endowment of nutrients. They have not been highly processed nor do they contain synthetic, artificial or irradiated ingredients. And whenever possible, The Healthy Way of Eating emphasizes "Organically Grown" foods, since they not only promote your health, but also the health of our planet.

Foods Avoided

The Healthy Way of Eating avoids foods that are nutrient sparse, foods that are low in nutrients but high in calories; these foods give you very little in terms of nutrition, but use up a lot of your day’s calories. Additionally, highly processed foods as well as foods that contain synthetic chemical additives are also avoided in The Healthy Way of Eating.

Nutrient Excesses/
Deficiencies

The World’s Healthiest Foods are among the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet! Consequently, this diet provides sufficient amounts of all essential vitamins and minerals. Because The Healthy Way of Eating is based on these foods, the diet is naturally low in calories, saturated fat, and cholesterol.

Who Benefits

Anyone presently consuming the Standard American Diet, which is based on processed and fast-foods, will benefit from eating more of the World’s Healthiest Foods.

Who is Harmed

Assuming a sufficient amount of calories are eaten to maintain body weight and provide energy for physical activity, The Healthy Way of Eating does not pose risk to anyone.

Menu Ideas

It takes just one week of using a menu plan from The Healthy Way of Eating for the body to begin to exhibit the many nutritional benefits of eating the World's Healthiest Foods. After just 7 days, you will have more energy and feel better and more alive. After you try a menu plan and like the results, you’ll find a new recipe every day that fits the weather and the availability of different foods, and lets you enjoy the wonderful tastes of the healthy foods that are in season. Visit the Feel Great in 7 Days Menu Plan for an example of a 7 day Menu Planner.

Resources

References

  • . Whole foods. What they give you that supplements can't. Mayo Clin Health Lett 1998 Aug;16(8):7.
  • . National standards for organic foods proposed. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000 May 1;216(9):1381.
  • Adams JF, Engstrom A. Helping consumers achieve recommended intakes of whole grain foods. J Am Coll Nutr 2000 Jun;19(3 Suppl):339S-44S.
  • Albertson AM, Tobelmann RC. Consumption of grain and whole-grain foods by an American population during the years 1990 to 1992. J Am Diet Assoc 1995 Jun;95(6):703-4.
  • Ali M, Thomson M, Afzal M. Garlic and onions: their effect on eicosanoid metabolism and its clinical relevance. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2000 Feb;62(2):55-73. Review.
  • Amaditz KC. The Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 and its impending regulations: a big zero for organic food. Food Drug Law J 1997;52(4):537-59.
  • Anderson JW, Hanna TJ, Peng X, Kryscio RJ. Whole grain foods and heart disease risk. J Am Coll Nutr 2000 Jun;19(3 Suppl):291S-9S.
  • Beecher C. Cancer preventive properties of varieties of Brassica oleracea: a review. Am J Clin Nutr 1994;59(Suppl):1166S-70S.
  • Berhow MA, Bennett RD, Poling SM, et al. Acylated flavonoids in callus cultures of Citrus aurantifolia. Phytochemistry 1994 Jul;36(5):1225-7.
  • Bond R, Lloyd DH. A double-blind comparison of olive oil and a combination of evening primrose oil and fish oil in the management of canine atopy. Vet Rec 1992 Dec 12;131(24):558-60.
  • Bruce B, Spiller GA, Klevay LM, Gallagher SK. A diet high in whole and unrefined foods favorably alters lipids, antioxidant defenses, and colon function. J Am Coll Nutr 2000 Feb;19(1):61-7.
  • Canal JR, Torres MD, Romero A, Perez C. A chloroform extract obtained from a decoction of Ficus carica leaves improves the cholesterolaemic status of rats with streptozotocin- induced diabetes. Acta Physiol Hung 2000;87(1):71-6.
  • Challier B, Perarnau JM, Viel JF. Garlic, onion and cereal fibre as protective factors for breast cancer: a French case-control study. Eur J Epidemiol 1998 Dec;14(8):737-47.
  • de Amorin A, Borba HR, Carauta JP, et al. Anthelmintic activity of the latex of Ficus species. J Ethnopharmacol 1999 Mar;64(3):255-8.
  • Dorant E, van den Brandt PA, Goldbohm RA. A prospective cohort study on the relationship between onion and leek consumption, garlic supplement use and the risk of colorectal carcinoma in The Netherlands. Carcinogenesis 1996 Mar;17(3):477-84.
  • Fan Y, Ding Z, Yang L, et al. [A preliminary study on bioactivity of orange and tangerine peel extracts against aphis and mites]. Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi 1995 Jul;20(7):397-8, 446.
  • Fisher BE. Organic: What's in a name. Environ Health Perspect 1999 Mar;107(3):A150-3.
  • Fukushima S, Takada N, Hori T, Wanibuchi H. Cancer prevention by organosulfur compounds from garlic and onion. J Cell Biochem Suppl 1997;27:100-5.
  • Galati EM, Monforte MT, Kirjavainen S, et al. Biological effects of hesperidin, a citrus flavonoid. (Note I): antiinflammatory and analgesic activity. Farmaco 1994 Nov;40(11):709-12.
  • Galati EM, Trovato A, Kirjavainen S, et al. Biological effects of hesperidin, a Citrus flavonoid. (Note III): antihypertensive and diuretic activity in rat. Farmaco 1996 Mar;51(3):219-21.
  • Gharagozloo M, Ghaderi A. Immunomodulatory effect of concentrated lime juice extract on activated human mononuclear cells. J Ethnopharmacol 2001 Sep;77(1):85-90.
  • Kawaii S, Tomono Y, Katase E, et al. Antiproliferative effects of the readily extractable fractions prepared from various citrus juices on several cancer cell lines. J Agric Food Chem 1999 Jul;47(7):2509-12.
  • Kawamori T, Tanaka T, Ohnishi M, et al. Chemoprevention of azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis by dietary feeding of S-methyl methane thiosulfonate in male F344 rats. Cancer Res 1995 Sep 15;55(18):4053-8.
  • Kinmonth AL, Angus RM, Jenkins PA, et al. Whole foods and increased dietary fibre improve blood glucose control in diabetic children. Arch Dis Child 1982 Mar;57(3):187-94.
  • Kurilich AC, Tsau GJ, Brown A, et al. Carotene, tocopherol, and ascorbate contents in subspecies of Brassica oleracea. J Agric Food Chem 1999 Apr;47(4):1576-81.
  • Kushad MM, Brown AF, Kurilich AC, et al. Variation of glucosinolates in vegetable crops of Brassica oleracea. J Agric Food Chem 1999 Apr;47(4):1541-8.
  • Martinez-Dominguez E, de la Puerta R, Ruiz-Gutierrez V. Protective effects upon experimental inflammation models of a polyphenol-supplemented virgin olive oil diet. Inflamm Res 2001 Feb;50(2):102-6.
  • Mata L, Vargas C, Saborio D, Vives M. Extinction of Vibrio cholerae in acidic substrata: contaminated cabbage and lettuce treated with lime juice. Rev Biol Trop 1994 Dec;42(3):487-92.
  • Misra N, Batra S, Mishra D. Fungitoxic properties of the essential oil of Citrus limon (L.) Burm. against a few dermatophytes. Mycoses 1988 Jul;31(7):380-2.
  • Miyake Y, Murakami A, Sugiyama Y, et al. Identification of coumarins from lemon fruit (Citrus limon) as inhibitors of in vitro tumor promotion and superoxide and nitric oxide generation. J Agric Food Chem 1999 Aug;47(8):3151-7.
  • Ogata S, Miyake Y, Yamamoto K, et al. Apoptosis induced by the flavonoid from lemon fruit (Citrus limon BURM. f.) and its metabolites in HL-60 cells. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2000 May;64(5):1075-8.
  • Perez C, Canal JR, Campillo JE, et al. Hypotriglyceridaemic activity of Ficus carica leaves in experimental hypertriglyceridaemic rats. Phytother Res 1999 May;13(3):188-91.
  • Rapisarda P, Tomaino A, Lo Cascio R, et al. Antioxidant effectiveness as influenced by phenolic content of fresh orange juices. J Agric Food Chem 1999 Nov;47(11):4718-23.
  • Riley DM, Bianchini F, Vainio H. Allium vegetables and organosulfur compounds: do they help prevent cancer. Environ Health Perspect 2001 Sep;109(9):893-902.
  • Rodrigues A, Brun H, Sandstrom A. Risk factors for cholera infection in the initial phase of an epidemic in Guinea-Bissau: protection by lime juice. Am J Trop Med Hyg 1997 Nov;57(5):601-4.
  • Rodrigues A, Sandstrom A, Ca T, et al. Protection from cholera by adding lime juice to food - results from community and laboratory studies in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Trop Med Int Health 2000 Jun;5(6):418-22.
  • Rubnov S, Kashman Y, Rabinowitz R, et al. Suppressors of cancer cell proliferation from fig (Ficus carica) resin: isolation and structure elucidation. J Nat Prod 2001 Jul;64(7):993-6.
  • Scheiber MD, Liu JH, Subbiah MT, et al. Dietary inclusion of whole soy foods results in significant reductions in clinical risk factors for osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease in normal postmenopausal women. Menopause 2001 Sep-2001 Oct 31;8(5):384-92.
  • Serraclara A, Hawkins F, Perez C, et al. Hypoglycemic action of an oral fig-leaf decoction in type-I diabetic patients. Diabetes Res Clin Pract 1998 Jan;39(1):19-22.
  • Siddiqi M, Tricker AR, Preussmann R. Formation of N-nitroso compounds under simulated gastric conditions from Kashmir foodstuffs. Cancer Lett 1988 Apr;39(3):259-65.
  • Slavin JL. Mechanisms for the impact of whole grain foods on cancer risk. J Am Coll Nutr 2000 Jun;19(3 Suppl):300S-7S.
  • Stange RR Jr, Midland SL, Eckert JW, Sims JJ. An antifungal compound produced by grapefruit and Valencia orange after wounding of the peel. J Nat Prod 1993 Sep;56(9):1627-9.
  • Stoewsand GS. Bioactive organosulfur phytochemicals in Brassica oleracea vegetables-- a review. Food Chem Toxicol 1995 Jun;33(6):537-43.
  • Stoewsand GS, Anderson JL, Munson L. Protective effect of dietary brussels sprouts against mammary carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Cancer Lett 1988 Mar;39(2):199-207.
  • Stoewsand GS, Anderson JL, Munson L, Lisk DJ. Effect of dietary brussels sprouts with increased selenium content on mammary carcinogenesis in the rat. Cancer Lett 1989 Apr;45(1):43-8.
  • United States Congress. Organic Foods Production Act of 1990. Public Law 701-624: 1990; Title 21, U.S. 1990 Farm Bill.
  • Visioli F, Romani A, Mulinacci N, et al. Antioxidant and other biological activities of olive mill waste waters. J Agric Food Chem 1999 Aug;47(8):3397-401.
  • Welsh S, Shaw A, Davis C. Achieving dietary recommendations: whole-grain foods in the Food Guide Pyramid. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 1994;34(5-6):441-51.
  • Worthington V. Nutritional quality of organic versus conventional fruits, vegetables, and grains. J Altern Complement Med 2001 Apr;7(2):161-73.
  • Worthington V. Effect of agricultural methods on nutritional quality: a comparison of organic with conventional crops. Altern Ther Health Med 1998 Jan;4(1):58-69.
  • Yurtsever E, Yardimci KT. The in vivo effect of a Brassica oleracea var. capitata extract on Ehrlich ascites tumors of MUS musculus BALB/C mice. Drug Metabol Drug Interact 1999;15(2-3):215-22.

This page was updated on: 2003-02-26 20:01:58
© 2002 The George Mateljan Foundation